Intimate Partner Violence Program

The LOFT is proud to announce the development of our new Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) program.

The CDC defines Intimate Partner Violence as physical violence, sexual violence, stalking and psychological aggression (including coercive acts) by a current or former intimate partner.

The LOFT’s Intimate Partner Violence Program serves to provide advocacy, connection, and support for LGBTQ survivors of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV).

This programming will include:

  • Access to an on-staff LGBTQ IPV Advocate at The LOFT with expertise in support and resource connection for survivors
  • A monthly safe-space drop-in service with licensed counselors and LOFT IPV Advocate on-site to meet with community members on both a pre-scheduled and walk-in basis
  • Professionally facilitated monthly process group for survivors
  • Community outreach, advocacy, education and training resources
  • Quarterly Healthy Relationships Workshops with on-site licensed counselor and LOFT Advocate

If you are experiencing violence and abuse from and intimate partner, please reach out to us. You are not alone. The LOFT is a safe-space, together we will connect you with the supportive services you need.

Call, email or stop by the center to speak with The LOFT's IPV Advocate, Shepard Verbas.

(914) 948-2932 ext. 14

shepard@loftgaycenter.org

Advocate Hours:

Mon.- 11am-4pm
Tues./Wed.- 11am-6pm
Thurs./Fri.- 10:30am-1:30pm


According to NCAVP's 2015 Report on Intimate Partner Violence in LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities:

  • People of color made up 77% of the reports of LGBTQ and HIV-affected IPV homicides, and 54% of the total number of survivors who reported to NCAVP in 2015
  • Transgender women were three times more likely to report experiencing sexual and financial violence
  • LGBTQ survivors with disabilities were two times more likely to be isolated by their abusive partner and four times more likely to experience financial violence
  • In 2015, there was an increase in the percentage of undocumented survivors; from 4% in 2014 to 9% in 2015
  • 44% of survivors attempting to access emergency shelter were denied and 71% reported being denied because of their gender identity
  • Out of the total number of survivors who interacted with law enforcement, 25% said that the police were either indifferent or hostile, and 31% of LGBTQ susrivors who intereacted with police said they experienced misarrest.